Posts Tagged ‘causes’

DC Food Blogger Bake Sale to Fight Child Hunger — This Saturday!

Monday, April 12th, 2010

Nearly 1 in 4 children in the US do not have enough food to eat — that’s nearly 17 million kids. This weekend, Share our Strength kicks off their annual “Great American Bake Sale” campaign — where volunteers across the country host bake sales to raise funds for SOS’s efforts to end child hunger. Saturday will be the first-ever National Food Bloggers Bake Sale, to further help raise awareness for this important cause.

The DC bake sale will be held this Saturday, April 17, from 9am-12noon at DC’s Historic Eastern Market. So come on by and look for our table outside near the farmers line.

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Some of the local bloggers who will be participating:

If you’d like to chip in to help us reach our goal, please visit our team page to make a contribution now. And we hope to see you at Eastern Market on Saturday!

Outside DC, visit What’s Gaby Cooking for a list of food blogger bake sales in other states.

Save the Date! National Food Blogger Bake Sale, April 17

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2010

I’m a firm believer in eating, er, cooking for a good cause, so I’m delighted to be helping with the first ever National Food Bloggers Bake Sale to benefit Share our Strength and their work to end childhood hunger. On April 17, food bloggers across the US will unite to support the cause by holding bake sales in their states. Readers will have the opportunity to taste the baked goods from their favorite food blogs at each state’s bake sale location. The event is being organized by the fabulous Gaby Dalkin of WhatsGabyCooking.com.

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DC BAKE SALE: The DC bake sale will be held Saturday, April 17, from 9am-12noon at DC’s Historic Eastern Market. So come on by and look for our table outside near the farmers line. There are some great local bloggers participating, stay tuned for a list closer to the date.

Funds raised through Great American Bake Sale support Share Our Strength’s efforts to end childhood hunger in America.  Nearly 17 million— almost one in four—children in America face hunger. Despite the good efforts of governments, private-sector institutions and everyday Americans, millions of our children still don’t have daily access to the nutritious meals they need to live active, healthy lives. More information on SOS can be found at http://strength.org/.

If you’re in DC and would like to participate, please send me an email at foodietots (at) gmail (dot) com. Outside DC, visit Gaby’s blog for a list of coordinators in other states (and states needing hosts). And wherever you live, please make plans to stop by and purchase some yummy treats that day!

Operation No Kid Hungry

Friday, February 6th, 2009

I’ve written before about Share Our Strength and their work to fight childhood hunger in cities and neighborhoods across the US. I’m on the volunteer committee for their upcoming Taste of the Nation event here in DC, so you can expect to hear more from me on ways to help support their efforts. The new campaign, below, takes just a few seconds so please check it out and consider making a contribution and telling your friends about it, too!

Share Our Strength has launched a brand new campaign to raise funds to help end childhood hunger.  “Operation No Kid Hungry” responds to President Obama’s call to action to end childhood hunger by 2015.

Share Our Strength has partnered with AT&T to make it easy to support and participate in “Operation No Kid Hungry”:

Donate by text: Text “SHARE” to 20222 on your mobile device to donate $5. AT&T will match all text donations up to $100,000. Help us meet this challenge grant! Click here to find out more.

For more information about “Operation No Kid Hungry” and how you can help end childhood hunger, visit Share Our Strength’s website.

Mercury, Salmonella and Nitrates, Oh My

Friday, January 30th, 2009

It’s been quite a week for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). I had planned to write about organic farming as the next installment of our Sustainable Family Supper Project, but got waylaid reading everything I could get my hands (or mouse) on about the latest high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) shocker. (Check back Monday for the kick-off of Save Our Farms week.) I wanted to find something constructive to write about that would not encourage you all to just throw up your hands and give up, which frankly I have been tempted to do myself.

Just to review, the nation’s largest recall, of peanut products from a plant who knowingly shipped contaminated products, has evoked this encouraging response from the FDA: “‘I don’t think we can determine how many more’ products will be recalled, [said] Stephen F. Sundlof, director of the Center for Food Safety.” Even worse, Sandlof doesn’t see the flaw in a system that puts responsibility on producers to essentially police themselves, asserting,

“[I]t is the responsibility of the industry to produce safe product. The FDA is not in plants on a continuous basis. We do rely on inspections to find problems when they exist. … We expect individual citizens to obey the law. And occasionally people don’t obey the law. And when they don’t obey the law then the responsibility of the regulatory authorities to take the appropriate enforcement action.”

In outside studies – goodness knows the FDA doesn’t have the resources or inclination to proactively study the toxicity of our food supply – measurable levels of mercury were found in name-brand, HFCS-containing products ranging from ketchup to chocolate syrup and yogurt, and a Taiwanese study showed a significant increase in the risk of childhood leukemia in children who consumed more than one nitrate-preserved meat product per week (e.g., bacon, hot dogs, deli meat).

The thing about the HFCS-mercury link, which the corn industry was predictably quick to claim was insignificant, is that it is entirely avoidable and unnecessary. Manufacturing technology exists, and is already widely used in Europe and the US, that does not impart a touch of mercury into our food products. Mercury gets into our bodies and environment from many sources, and it is the cumulative effect of the toxin over our lifetime that is of concern. There is no point quibbling over whether the amounts in HFCS are themselves significant, when it is a preventable increase in our lifetime of exposure. (You will, no doubt, be relieved to know that mercury is naturally-occurring, so the fact that it is introduced to those natural genetically-modified corn kernels as they are processed by genetically-engineered enzymes to produce all-natural high fructose corn syrup shouldn’t jeopardize the corn refiners’ FDA approval to market HFCS as “natural.”) As other concerned parents have noted, it’s virtually impossible to avoid HFCS if you don’t have the time or resources to buy only organic products and cook every meal from scratch. Shouldn’t the FDA at the very least require that manufacturers notify consumers what they may be consuming?

What can concerned parents and foodies do in the face of constant alarming news reports?

A. Eat less processed foods. Yogurt, fruit juice, bread – none of these need HFCS. Consumer demand switching to organics/natural sweeteners has the corn industry panicked; let’s keep it that way.

B. Ask your legislators to join Senator Richard Durbin (D-IL) and Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) in calling for a new Food Safety Administration. Food & Water Watch has a webform set up to email your representatives to ask them to cosponsor DeLauro’s “Food Safety Modernization Act,” which would streamline food safety oversight and increase inspections. It’s not a perfect solution, but it’s a significant step in the right direction — a safer food supply for all.

Alright, enough doom and gloom for one day. Check out The Green Parent’s “Green and Healthy Super Bowl Snacks,” and enjoy the weekend!

[Update: I noticed in reading the blogs that pro-HFCS Google ads were popping up, and sure enough there's one on my post. I'm torn between blocking it and letting them waste more of their marketing money, so for now it's up.]

Menu for Hope

Monday, December 15th, 2008

December is full of sweets to bake, gifts to buy and too many worthwhile causes to support. Here’s one more I hope you’ll consider, a chance to join with all your favorite food bloggers to support the World Food Programme and have a chance to win some wonderful foodie gifts for yourself. The Menu for Hope fundraiser was launched by Pim of Chez Pim five years ago, and raised nearly $100,000 last year for the school lunch and farming program for children in Lesotho. Just $10 gets you one raffle entry for the prize of your choosing, and you can enter as many times as you like!

Here’s what we’re donating:

Hand-crafted Marshmallows and Barefoot Contessa autographed cookbook (Prize # UE20)
An autographed copy of the Barefoot Contessa’s newest book,
Back to Basics, and a dozen hand-crafted marshmallows (flavor to be determined) from the Dairy Godmother in Alexandria, Virginia.
(Continental US only) Donated by FoodieTots.com.

Hop on over to Steamy Kitchen, the East Coast host, to review more prizes, and then go to the FirstGiving donation page to contribute.

Donation Instructions:
1. Choose a prize or prizes of your choice from our Menu for Hope at http://chezpim.com
2. Go to the donation site at http://www.firstgiving.com/menuforhope5 and make a donation.
3. Each $10 you donate will give you one raffle ticket toward a prize of your choice. Please specify which prize you’d like in the ‘Personal Message’ section in the donation form when confirming your donation. You must write-in how many tickets per prize, and please use the prize code.
For example, a donation of $50 can be 2 tickets for EU01 and 3 tickets for EU02. Please write 2xEU01, 3xEU02
4. If your company matches your charity donation, please check the box and fill in the information so we could claim the corporate match.
5. Please allow us to see your email address so that we could contact you in case you win.  Your email address will not be shared with anyone.

See the FAQs for more details. Thanks for your support!