Posts Tagged ‘goat cheese’

Kabocha Squash Apple Tacos with Chèvre {#MeatlessMonday}

Monday, October 14th, 2013

Did you know the Meatless Monday campaign celebrates its 10th anniversary this fall? To celebrate, I wanted to make some vegetarian tacos — and I just happened to have a beautiful Kabocha squash on hand. I spiced and roasted the squash for a warm, fall flavor and then added a sweet apple to balance the spicy squash. This roasted squash and apple combo is a great kid-friendly side dish on its own, but it was especially delicious atop warmed corn tortillas with cilantro and crumbled chèvre. This will make a repeat appearance on our Taco Tuesday menu very soon!

Kabocha Squash Apple Tacos with Chevre by FoodieTots

You can use butternut or acorn squash if you prefer, but I loved the green-orange hues and rich flavor of the Kabocha. I went a little lighter on the spices for the kids, so I’ve given a range below — cumin is a great early spice for babies and toddlers as it adds flavor without too much heat, so you could even mash up the roasted squash and (peeled) apples for your littlest eaters.

Recipe: Roasted Squash Apple Tacos with Chèvre
Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 1 Kabocha squash (approximately 2 1/2 cups peeled and diced)
  • 1 apple, diced
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 1/2 to 2 teaspoons cumin
  • 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1/4 teaspoon Kosher salt
  • 8 corn tortillas
  • fresh cilantro to garnish
  • 4 ounces fresh goat cheese
  • salsa verde and/or Sriracha, optional if you prefer your tacos hot

Instructions:
1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
2. Place diced squash in a bowl and drizzle with olive oil. Add cumin, paprika and salt and toss to coat evenly. Spread in an even layer on baking sheet and roast 15 minutes.
3. Stir squash gently and add apple. Return to oven and roast an additional 10 to 15 minutes, until squash is tender and apples are lightly browned.
4. Warm tortillas and serve with a spoonful of squash-apple filling, pinch of cilantro and tablespoon of chèvre.

This recipe is linked to the Meatless Monday blog hop at Recipe Renovator.

To commemorate the 10th anniversary, a Meatless Monday Scientific Symposium will be held Thursday, Oct. 17, at 4 pm — get details and watch the live stream from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health here.

Braised Summer Squash with Chèvre {#6SecondRecipe for #MeatlessMonday}

Monday, September 9th, 2013

As much as I love summer, I just adore the farmers market in September. Tomatoes, corn and summer squash share table space with autumn squash, beans and early apples for a few fleeting weeks of seasonal overlap. Of course, when temperatures are still in the 80s or even 90s here in DC, it’s nice to still have so many fresh ingredients for fast meals now that the kids are back in school.

Braised Summer Squash with Chevre | FoodieTots.com

To celebrate back-to-school season, we’re sharing a series of 6-second, 6-ingredient recipes for fast weeknight meals. That’s right Rachael Ray, I’ve seen your 30-minute meals and I think I can do it 29 minutes, 54 seconds faster. Okay, maybe not quite. But I can use my favorite Vine video app to show how to make a quick family meal — even if I can’t guarantee it can be done in 6 seconds. I hope you’ll still find it useful.

And, this one is meatless, too, as we join the new Meatless Monday blog hop hosted by Recipe Renovator. So go check that out for even more ideas — even if you have your meatless meals on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday …. going meatless occasionally can be another good way to shave time off your dinner prep.

Braised Summer Squash from Colleen | GlassBottle on Vimeo.

Recipe: Braised Summer Squash with Chèvre
Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon butter or olive oil
  • 3-4 summer squash, sliced
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste concentrate
  • 1/4 cup white wine
  • several fresh basil leaves, torn
  • 2 ounces fresh goat cheese
  • salt and pepper

Instructions:

  1. Heat butter or olive oil in sauté pan over medium high heat.
  2. Add squash and cook, turning occasionally, until soft and just beginning to brown.
  3. Add tomato paste concentrate and stir. Add white wine and cook another minute or two.
  4. Remove from heat and sprinkle with torn basil, salt and pepper to taste. Crumble goat cheese over top and serve.

Kids & Kids: Vermont Creamery and Zutano Giveaway!

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

It’s time to come clean, dear readers. When they’re not nibbling their way through farmers markets or attending new store openings, the foodie tots have another secret identity: curd kids. One of the hazards of also authoring a cheese blog is that I often have a surplus of cheeses in the refrigerator. Really good cheeses. And I have made it a point to introduce those cheeses to the foodie tots from a really young age. Before birth, in fact — as children begin to develop taste preferences even in utero. So it should come as no surprise that a steady diet of decadent goat cheeses, stinky blues and Vermont cheddars while I was pregnant and nursing has left me attempting in vain to fend off the kids’ attempts to snatch a nibble when I’m photographing cheese for the blog.

foodietots love chevre

And it’s also no surprise that when Vermont Butter & Cheese Creamery reached out to me about their “Kids & Kids” campaign, I jumped at the chance to share it with you here. Raising kids on real food extends to the dairy case, after all. And goats milk is fantastic for little stomachs — easier to digest than cows milk and less allergenic. Plus, the cheeses made by Vermont Creamery come from happy goats like these:

goats at ayers dairy farm

What’s not to love?

Vermont Creamery sent their fresh chevre logs and their creamy goat cheese tubs for us to play with. The first one we opened, roasted red pepper, was immediately devoured as a dip for pita chips. The second, olive and herb, was used to replace mayo for a super fresh and light-tasting tuna salad. The youngest tot’s only complaint was that there weren’t enough olives!

tuna salad with chevre recipe

Recipe: Tuna Salad with Chevre
Makes 4 servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 5-ounce can tuna
  • 1 4-ounce tub olive and herb creamy goat cheese
  • 1 tablespoon chopped green onions
  • salt & pepper
  • optional: additional olives for garnish

Instructions:
1. Use a fork to gently combine tuna and creamy goat cheese.
2. Fold in green onions/chives, sprinkle with a pinch of salt and pepper, and serve, as a dip for crackers, or use to make sandwiches.

Some other ways we’ve incorporated chèvre into our meals include:

  • Spreading it on toast and topping with a touch of honey or maple syrup; Spreading the plain creamy goat cheese on toasted bagels (and topping it with farm fresh tomatoes;*
  • On top of salads (especially the herbed chèvre log);
  • Folding it into scrambled eggs;
  • Making labneh (a Middle Eastern dish typically made with strained yogurt) by drizzling room-temperature chèvre with olive oil, sea salt, pepper, and thyme, giving it a quick mash with a fork, and serving with pita bread slices and fresh tomatoes and cucumber.

*Unlike the conventional cream cheese brands, full of additives, VBC’s creamy goat cheese is simply pasteurized goats milk, culture, enzymes and salt. Gotta love that.

foodietot wears zutano

GIVEAWAY! One lucky reader will win their own shipment of goat cheese from Vermont Creamery AND a $75 gift certificate to Zutano, makers of colorful and durable kids clothing that we’ve loved for years. Like Vermont Creamery, Zutano is a Vermont-based company dedicated to quality.

the foodietots love vermont creamery and zutano

HOW TO ENTER: Leave a comment below with your kid(s)’ favorite way to eat goat cheese — or, how you plan to introduce it to them if they haven’t yet tried it.

For an additional entry, “Like” FoodieTots, Vermont Creamery and Zutano on Facebook and leave an additional comment below letting us know you have.

And be sure to visit the “Kids & Kids” Pinterest board for more ideas on how to share goat cheese with your kids.

A winner (US entries only, please) will be chosen at random after 11:59pm, Eastern time, on Sunday, August 11, 2013.

Update: Congratulations to Shandra! I’ve contacted you via email. And thanks to everyone else for entering and reading FoodieTots!

Disclosure: I have a relationship with Vermont Creamery through my cheese blog and they and Zutano provided product samples and the giveaway prize. No other compensation was received for this post and all words and opinions are, as always, my own.

At Market: Watermelon Carpaccio with Chèvre

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2011

It’s melon season! The foodie tots and I can’t get enough of melons in every size and color — we’ve enjoyed cantaloupe, honeydew, sun melon, a melon that looked like cantaloupe on the outside but was green like honeydew on the inside, and of course, watermelon. Now, I consider myself something of a watermelon expert, having been quoted on the subject in the Washington Post (cough), but I was still shocked to spot orange watermelon at the Reston Farmers Market this past weekend.

summer of melon love

After tweeting a picture, a friend suggested sprinkling fennel pollen on the melon. I couldn’t find fennel pollen at Whole Foods (uh, where else would it be?), but remembered that Cypress Grove‘s Purple Haze chèvre is made with lavender and fennel pollen. And so this quick summer appetizer was born: extremely thin slivers of watermelon, drizzled with extra virgin olive oil, a heavy pinch of sea salt, and topped with crumbled Purple Haze chèvre. It’s not really a recipe as a suggestion: you could mix it up with flavored vinegars, use plain chèvre to keep it local, and/or top with fresh mint or basil or any other herbs from the garden.

watermelon carpaccio with chevre

The kids were intrigued — the boy asked for a helping of “my” watermelon alongside his straight-up slices, and the bebe nibbled a few crumbs of chèvre before turning her attention back to the melon. What’s your favorite watermelon recipe? (And you do buy seeded melons, right? Remember, Seedless is Soulless. ;-) )

One Local Buffalo Steak and Garlic Scapes

Tuesday, June 16th, 2009

one local summer 2009This past week we got our first garlic scapes in our CSA bag. Garlic scapes are the curly bright green shoots of a young garlic plant, not to be confused with the “green garlic” stalks that soon follow. Last summer at a New York farmers market, I watched a farmer practically plead with a skeptical customer to give them a try. If you love garlic, you can’t go wrong — but if you’re expecting something mild like a chive, you’ll be in for a pungent surprise.

garlic scapes

Garlic scapes are commonly used in pesto — a great way to store them for later use as the scape season is fairly brief. And I like to throw them whole on the grill for a little mellower flavor and perfect accompaniment to a grilled steak. grilled steak garlic scapeThis week we again had Cibola Farm’s buffalo meat, the steaks rubbed with olive oil, smoked paprika, oregano, salt and pepper before grilling. We also had home-baked brioche, which is not exactly local as I don’t have local flour, but I’m taking partial credit here because the rich brioche dough got a boost of flavor from our local, cage-free farmers market eggs and butter. I haven’t had much time to bake lately but am looking forward to cooking up some cherry treats now that the first cherries have arrived at our local markets. We snacked on Emperor Francis cherries from Long Meadow Ecological Farm found at DC’s Eastern Market on Saturday.

We’ve also been snacking on some local goat cheeses from Firefly Farms and Spriggs Delight in Maryland. You can read more about them over on the cheese blog.

Recipe: Grilled Garlic Scapes

  • 4 garlic scapes, rinsed
  • 1 drizzle olive oil
  • course salt and pepper

Instructions: Toss the scapes in olive oil till lightly coated. Place on hot grill over high heat and sear several minutes, until soft and grill marks appear. Remove from heat and season with salt and pepper. Serve along side your favorite grilled meat or fish. Enjoy!

One Local Summer is an annual challenge in which people around the world join together for 13 weeks of seasonal eating, supporting local farmers and exploring their local foodsheds. Visit FarmtoPhilly on Tuesdays for the weekly round-up; here’s what my neighbors in the Southern region cooked up this week.