Posts Tagged ‘kuhn orchard’

July at FRESHFARM Crystal City #MarketVine

Tuesday, July 23rd, 2013

July is the month for cherries and berries at DC farmers markets — what have you been baking with these beauties?

FreshFarm Crystal City — July from Colleen | GlassBottle on Vimeo.

This week’s #MarketVine is from FRESHFARM Crystal City, with one of our favorite vendors: Kuhn Orchards of Adams County, Pennsylvania. The fourth generation family farm grows some of the best stone fruits and berries around, including rare berries like gooseberries and currants. And their berry sampler cups are the best-ever “fast food” snack for hungry foodie tots while roaming the market.

Visit FRESHFARM Crystal City
Tuesdays, 3 to 7pm (Seasonal: April to November)
251 S. 18th and Bell Sts. (Across from Crystal City Metro)

It’s Pie o’Clock! Cherries Going Fast

Saturday, June 23rd, 2012

It may sound strange, but the mild winter we had actually was not a good thing for our region’s fruit farmers. Cherries in particular have had a hard time, between blossoming too early and heavy rains during harvest.

sour cherries at market

From Kuhn Orchards:

Mother Nature was not kind this year, but we made the most of it.  During evenings that reached freezing temperatures, we sprayed water on our cherry trees to insulate the blossoms with the frozen water to try to save the crop. After the blossoms were pollinated and the fruit set, the cherries were very small and eventually aborted and fell off the tree. …

Cherries, in fact, can absorb water through their skin – again, causing them to crack.  So, Mother Nature’s Power of rain in regard to cherries is two-fold.

After light showers, Rusty, our farm manager, will use the air blast sprayer to blow air through the cherry trees and try to blow off any excess moisture so it won’t be absorbed through the cherry’s skin.

We take great measures even to just harvest a little crop.

– from Kuhn Orchards newsletter

So if you spot sour cherries at market this weekend, snap them up — and thank your farmer!

(You can find Kuhn at the Vienna, Fairfax, 14th & U, Lorton and Palisades Farmers Markets this weekend. Toigo may have sour cherries as well — and look for gooseberries from Black Rock. And if you need some pie inspiration, check out the world wide #PieParty2012 on Facebook — or my bourbon cherry cobbler recipe.)

Local Potluck Tuesday (and Fried Baby Artichokes)

Tuesday, July 13th, 2010

I learned to love artichokes during college in California, where a big, steamed choke and bowl of melted butter with wine (for dipping) was one of my favorite meals. The array of drop dead gorgeous artichokes at the Portland Farmers Market two summers ago was one of the things that had me nearly begging my husband to move back west. So it’s safe to assume there may have been a tear or two of joy when I spotted these baby artichokes at Kuhn Orchard’s stand at the Crystal City Farmers Market.

I trimmed the prickly tops, peeled the stems, sliced them and fried them up, per a recipe found at Steamy Kitchen. I first fried slivered garlic to season the oil, a la the Pioneer Woman. After removing the chokes from the frying pan, I tossed them with sea salt, a generous dose of grated parmesan cheese and the fried garlic. They were fabulous and I probably chowed down on half the plate before they made it to the table. (That’s okay, they taste best hot anyway.)

If you’re lucky enough to find baby artichokes grown near you, this is the perfect appetizer for your next dinner party. Or just for Tuesday night.

Please join the Local Potluck and share what local foods you’ve enjoyed this past week!

a few guidelines:
1. Share a relevant post — a recipe, menu or pictures of a meal featuring local foods, from the farmers market, CSA, farm stand or your own garden — using the MckLinky widget below. In the link title field, enter both your post title and your name &/or blog name, e.g., “Lemon Cucumber Salad — Colleen @ FoodieTots.”

2. Bonus points if you included your kids in picking, growing, purchasing or cooking the ingredients for the meal! (And by bonus points, I mean increased likelihood of seeing your post featured in a future post.)

3. In your post, please link back to this post here at FoodieTots, so your readers can find the potluck and be encouraged to join in as well.  Of course if you don’t have a blog, you’re welcome to share in the comments.

That’s it! I hope you’ll join in and share what you’re cooking up that’s fresh & local to you!

{Editor’s Note: I’m on “maternity leave” for the next couple weeks. Posts are scheduled to keep you satiated (including a whole month of cherry recipes!), but please forgive me if I don’t respond to comments promptly.}

One Local Cherry Spare Ribs and Squash

Monday, July 6th, 2009

one local summer 2009We had a July 4th engagement party/barbecue to attend this year {congrats R & A!}, so the menu was out of our hands. The boy and I did make a cherry cobbler to take, though (recipe coming soon). And then we grilled Sunday night instead, a batch of Cheerwine-marinated spare ribs with eggplant and summer squash.

Cheerwine, for those who’ve never had it, is a cherry soda produced in North Carolina. We enjoyed routine deliveries while my little brother was stationed at Ft. Bragg, but have had it less frequently since he relocated.  While made outside the One Local Summer (OLS) 100ish-mile challenge border, we found it while stopping in a Food Lion on Virginia’s Northern Neck to stock up on another regional favorite, Northern Neck ginger ale. I don’t usually drink soda, let alone douse my dinner in high-fructose corn syrup*, but once a year or so we embrace our adopted Southern home and make Cheerwine ribs. This version used small pork spare ribs that were quickly grilled; lower and slower grilling will produce more tender ribs, but this was just fine for an easy meal to wrap up the long weekend. To up the health/OLS factor, we brushed the ribs with a fresh cherry glaze. I prefer a semi-tart cherry like Rainier or Queen Anne, but be warned that those produce a yellow sauce — so go with classic red cherries if you want that red color.

Recipe: Cheerwine Spare Ribs with Cherry Glaze

cheerwine marinated spare ribsIngredients:

Marinade:

  • 1.5 lb. pork spare ribs
  • sea salt
  • pepper
  • 2 garlic scapes, thinly sliced
  • 1 can Cheerwine (or other cherry cola)

Glaze:

  • 1 tablespoon grapeseed oil
  • 1 spring onion, white portion, minced
  • 1 cup cherries, pitted and halved
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar

cherry glazeIngredients: Season spare ribs with salt and pepper and place in shallow glass pan in a single layer. Sprinkle with scapes and pour Cheerwine over. Cover and let sit in refrigerator (turning if Cheerwine does not completely cover ribs) at least one hour, preferably half a day or longer. To make the glaze, put all ingredients in a small saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium low heat. Simmer on low until cherries are falling apart, about 20 minutes. Smash cherries with a fork or blend glaze in a food processor or blender until combined.

To cook the ribs, heat the grill to medium high. Reduce to medium and cook ribs for 3 minutes per side. Brush with cherry glaze and cook an additional minute per side. Serve with additional glaze (“cherry ketchup” for dipping if that appeals to your kids.) Serves 4. Enjoy!

cherry glazed ribs and grilled squash

Farms of Origin: Smith Meadows Farm (VA, spare ribs), Kuhn Orchard (PA, Queen Anne cherries), Potomac Vegetable Farms (VA, scapes, spring onion, zucchini), Three Way Farm (VA, eggplant, pattypan squash), VA honey. (*You can find glass-bottled Cheerwine made with the original cane sugar formula, but they’re even harder to come by this far north.)